Using Appetite Suppressants to Suppress hunger

Many people think that their weight problem is caused by not knowing when to stop eating. They reason that if they don’t feel hungry, they won’t eat as much and will lose weight. The appetite suppressant is designed to lessen a person’s psychological motivation for food. Here are a few of the more popular appetite suppressants being marketed today. If you read the fine print, most products work when combined with eating healthy and exercising.


Dexatrim has been a popular appetite suppressant for years. Its uses a blend of herbs traditionally believed to help lose weight. Dexatrim’s flagship product is called Results, a “drug free diet aid.” Its main ingredient is green tea extract. Fortunately, you can get the same benefits at much less cost by buying a box of green tea bags.


The most aggressively marketed diet pill is TrimSpa. It contains a blend of herbs, including hoodia and green tea extract. Although some ads claim that dieters have lost 36-98 pounds using TrimSpa, the fine print states that the product may not work for everyone. The ads state that the average weight loss per 8 week period is from 4.4 lbs to 7.03 lbs. Most users claim to lose about 1 pound per week, and many say it doesn't work at all.


The appetite suppressing effect of Hoodia Gordonii is due to a compound called P57. It affects the hypothalamus, the area of the brain that controls appetite, in the same manner that glucose triggers a "full" feeling after eating a meal. Supposedly, P57 is 10,000 times more powerful than glucose. Experts have testified that there really isn’t really enough P57 in hoodia products to have a measurable effect. Others have cautioned that P57 is related in structure to the drug digoxin, which has potentially lethal effects on the heart.


Zalestrim claims to be a female diet aid that promotes weight loss, enhances breast size, and is a sexual stimulant. Zalestrim is a blend of vitamins, herbs, and nutraceauticals designed to suppress appetite, boost female thermogenesis, support thyroid output, balance female hormones, naturally increase breast size, and support libido. There is no clinical evidence to support the claims of the manufacturer.

 

References

Doheney, Kathleen. Sept 6, 2006. Hoodia: Lots of Hoopla, Little Science; Few studies support the promise of the South African appetite suppressant, but believers abound. WebMD.

http://www.webmd.com/diet/guide/hoodia-lots-of-hoopla-little-science?page=1


MacLean DB, Luo LG. Increased ATP content/production in the hypothalamus may be a signal for energy-sensing of satiety: studies of the anorectic mechanism of a plant steroidal glycoside. Brain Research. 2004 Sep 10;1020(1-2):1-11.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15312781&dopt=Abstract

 
New Jersey Office of the Attorney General (October 16, 2003). New Jersey Sues Founder of Goen Seminars.

http://www.state.nj.us/lps/ca/press/goen.htm


Schlundt, David. No date. A Closer Look at the Use of Appetite Suppressants. Vanderbilt University Psychology Department. URL:

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/psychology/health_psychology/ppaweight.htm   Accessed 17 July 2007.


Wong Kathy. October 2006. Hoodia Gordonii Review. About.Com: Alternative Medicine.

http://altmedicine.about.com/od/popularhealthdiets/a/hoodia1.htm#

 
----------------. October 2006. What are Hoodia’s Side Effects? About.Com: Alternative Medicine.

http://altmedicine.about.com/od/hoodia/a/hoodiasideeff.htm


US Food and Drug Administration (March 26, 2004). Warning Letter for Weight Loss Products "TrimSpa Carb Blocker" and "TrimSpa Fat Blocker"

http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/wl-ltr14.html


 


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