Protein and Calories in Eggs

Eggs are probably one of the best sources of protein on the planet, and the truth is that there are few foods quite as good for you as the delicious white things that come out of a chicken's butt (yep, look it up!).

Take a look at the protein and calories in eggs:

1 large egg (50g)Protein (grams)CaloriesTotal Fat
Raw6.3724.7
Hard-Boiled6.3785.3
Fried in oil6.8987.4
Scrambled5755.5
Poached6.2694.7
Omelette5.3775.8
Duck egg (70g- raw)91309.6
Quail egg (9g - raw)1.2141

Interesting, isn't it, that the protein content of your eggs change according to the recipe?

Now, you may say, "But I've heard that eggs are actually BAD for your health, because they're loaded with cholesterol." That is true, but before you start freaking out, there are a few things you need to know about eggs.

Eggs and Cholesterol

You may fear that the cholesterol in eggs is something to fear, but for those who have no history of high cholesterol in their family, that fear is unfounded. See, eggs contain dietary cholesterol, which your body absorbs in addition to the cholesterol produced by your liver. However, not all dietary cholesterol is absorbed or turned into LDL cholesterol, and the cholesterol in eggs are really only a problem if your heart is prone to cholesterol issues.

Plus, the cholesterol is ONLY in the egg yolk. The egg white is completely free of cholesterol, so those very worried about their cholesterol levels can always cut out the yolk. According to WebMD, anyone can have at least 4 egg yolks per week--in fact, those who do often have LOWER cholesterol than those who eat NO egg yolks.

Eggs and Protein

When it comes to protein, eggs are one of the best sources on the planet. Not only do they contain VERY few calories (just 16 per egg white or 85 per egg), but the protein in eggs is very easily digestible. There is almost no saturated fat in the eggs, so you get a whole lot of protein with almost no downsides. Eggs are probably one of the healthiest proteins around simply because of its high nutritional value and low calorie content.

Eggs and Weight Loss

Did you know that eating eggs is one of the best ways to lose weight? Eggs are surprisingly filling, and you can curb your appetite with just a pair of eggs in the morning. In fact, a study found that overweight women who started their mornings with an egg breakfast ended up losing TWICE the amount of weight as the women who only had carbs for breakfast. That means that adding a pair of eggs to your morning is one of the best ways to fill up AND lose weight.

By eating eggs for breakfast, you do more than just fill your stomach--you satisfy your appetite. Your body usually craves protein, so giving your body eggs is the best way to signal that you have eaten enough and will not be hungry for a while. You'll find that having eggs as a breakfast food is one of the best ways to start your day.

Eggs and Nutrients

Eggs are LOADED with all kinds of important nutrients, and you'll find that few proteins are as nutritionally beneficial as these delicious things.

From eggs, you get Vitamin A for your skin and hair, Vitamin D for your bones, Vitamin E for your skin and cardiovascular system, Vitamin B12 for your metabolism, zinc for your endocrine system, iron to help your body produce more red blood cells, and even Omega-3 fatty acids to help prevent inflammation and improve brain health. There are so many nutrients in eggs that it's silly for you to ever think about NOT eating them. Eat more eggs to be a whole lot healthier!

 


8 Responses to Protein and Calories in Eggs

  1. Ashpk patel says:

    I want to know how we can improve a level of egg albumin protein in our body.my child suffering from kidney dieases.

  2. Amanda says:

    Why are there more calories and fat in a boiled egg than a raw egg? Isn't it the same thing but in a different form?

  3. Alex says:

    If, for instance, in raw eggs there is 6.3 grams of protein and 4.7 grans of fat... That equals 11 grams overall. If you say there is 50g of egg in a large egg, what are the other 39g made up of?

    • ReneeR says:

      Great question Alex. 50 g refers to the weight of the entire egg. After accounting for protein and fat, the remaining weight of 39 g comes from the egg shell, water (92% of egg white is purely water), trace minerals, and vitamins.

  4. Salvador says:

    I really like eggs, too bad they got cholesterol or I could eat a whole dozen a day.

  5. Brett says:

    Is ir just as good to eat the egg whites raw

  6. Dianne says:

    Is it bad for me to eat 4 eggs a day? I am on a Protein diet and it is much easier just to eat eggs.

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